West Pacific Duo: Neoguri Soaks Japan, Typhoon Bualoi Striking Northern Mariana Islands

Jonathan Erdman
Published: October 22, 2019

A pair of tropical cyclones spinning over the Western Pacific Ocean will each have impacts over the next day or so, including locally heavy rain in flood-weary Japan and another strike in the Northern Mariana Islands.

Tropical Storm Neoguri has a rather messy appearance on infrared satellite imagery, as increasingly strong winds aloft are shearing the storm.


Current Infrared Satellite Image

Neoguri produced 3 to 7 inches of rain Monday in parts of southern Japan, according to the Japan Meteorological Agency, and rain will continue through Tuesday.

While nowhere near as heavy as the record-smashing rain from Typhoon Hagibis just over a week ago, this rain may trigger at least some more local flash flooding and landslides in these saturated areas.

According to the Japan Times, at least 79 were killed and 2,400 homes were damaged or destroyed by flooding from Hagibis.

(PHOTOS: Massive Flooding in Japan From Typhoon Hagibis


Forecast Path, Rainfall

Marianas Threat Again

Meanwhile, another typhoon is moving through the Mariana Islands.

Typhoon Bualoi (pronounced byoo-AL-oy) is currently just over 200 miles north-northeast of Guam, moving northwestward.

The National Weather Service in Guam has issued a typhoon warning for the islands of Saipan and Tinian, and a tropical storm warning for Agrihan, Pagan and Alamagan in the Northern Mariana Islands.

Bualoi has intensified into a Category 4-equivalent typhoon. Fortunately, it appears Bualoi's eye is passing sufficiently far north to spare Saipan and Tinian its worst impacts. However, tropical-storm and, at times, typhoon-force winds are possible there through Tuesday morning.

The eye was moving closest to Anatahan, an unpopulated island that also experienced direct impacts from Hagibis.

The NWS forecasts 1 to 3 inches of additional rain in Saipan and Tinian, which could trigger life-threatening flash flooding and mudslides. Storm surge and dangerous surf is also expected.

Given the more northern forecast path of Bualoi, impacts in Guam were expected to be relatively benign, with just a few showers on the typhoon's outer edge and perhaps a few gusts toward tropical-storm force (39-plus mph), according to NWS-Guam.


Forecast Path

Fortunately, Bualoi should take a sharp enough north-then-northeast curl to keep it away from Japan later this week, as it eventually gets caught up in the jet stream.

Two weeks ago, Hagibis underwent one of the most startling rates of rapid intensification when it was near the Marianas, growing from a tropical storm to a Category 5 equivalent super typhoon in only 24 hours from Oct. 6 to 7.

Hagibis brought bands of heavy rain and gusty winds to the Northern Mariana Islands, including Guam and Saipan, late Oct. 7 into Oct. 8.

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.


The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.