Northeast Bomb Cyclone Lashes New England With Up to 90 MPH Wind Gusts, Sets October Low-Pressure Records

weather.com meteorologists
Published: October 17, 2019

A bomb cyclone lashing the Northeast has left over a half-million residents without power, downed numerous trees and set new October low-pressure records.

(MORE: Latest Northeast Impacts

Trees and powerlines have been downed in at least seven eastern states, particularly in southeast New England, where wind gusts up to 90 mph were clocked overnight. Sustained Category 2 hurricane-force winds were measured atop Mt. Washington, New Hampshire early Thursday morning.

The Northeast coastal storm easily met the criterion for a "bomb cyclone", a term some meteorologists use to classify surface lows whose pressure drops by at least least 24 millibars in 24 hours or less. This storm's central pressure plummeted 30 millibars in just 15 hours from late Wednesday morning to early Thursday morning.

This bomb cyclone set new October low-pressure records in Boston, Providence, Rhode Island; and Concord, New Hampshire, according to NOAA Weather Prediction Center meteorologist David Roth.

Happening Now

Wind gusts are subsiding in intensity a bit and rainfall is letting up in most spots.

Gusts from 20 to 40 mph are persisting over a large part of the Northeast, with higher gusts across southeast Massachusetts.

Rain is lingering in parts of upstate New York and northern New England, with some snow in the highest elevations. A scattering of flood warnings have been issued from in northern New York and Vermont. Sections of Route 5S were closed overnight due to flooding near Little Falls and Schuyler, New York.


Current Radar and Winds

Additional wind and rain reports can be found at the bottom of this article.

Forecast Timing

Thursday Evening

Rain will continue from New York state into New England as the strong low-pressure center heads toward Maine.

Precipitation will slowly diminish in these areas Thursday night. Some wet snow may dust the peaks of the Adirondacks, Green and White Mountains, but little snow will fall elsewhere.

Gusty winds will linger through much of the Northeast into Thursday night, with the strongest winds in northern New England early.


Thursday's Forecast

Forecast Rain, Wind Impacts

Additional rain totals of less than an inch are forecast in parts of northern New England and upstate New York.

Some mixture of rain and snow or just plain snow will also fall in the highest terrain of New England.

Winds could gust 30 to 40 mph at times into Thursday night in much of the Northeast, particularly over higher elevations.

These winds could break tree limbs and trigger additional power outages.

The rain and wind will also strip away some fall foliage in parts of New England. Portions of New England are currently experiencing peak fall color.

Wind and Rain Reports

The intense storm left over 550,000 customers without power from Maine to North Carolina to Ohio, according to poweroutages.us, and dozens of locations in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Connecticut closed or delayed school on Thursday.

Peak wind gusts, as of midday Thursday:

-Connecticut: 60 mph at Groton Airport

-Delaware: 56 mph at Kite Islands

-Maine: 81 mph near Bristol

-Maryland: 53 mph near Cumberland

-Massachusetts: 90 mph at Provincetown; 70 mph at Logan Airport

-New Hampshire: 128 mph on Mount Washington

-New Jersey: 59 mph at Beach Haven

-New York: 83 mph at Stony Brook (sensor located 390 feet above surface)

-Rhode Island: 70 mph at Westerly

Rainfall totals, as of midday Thursday:

-Connecticut: 6.14 inches near central Waterford; 5.14 inches in New London

-Maine: 3.70 inches near Cornish

-Massachusetts: 4.10 inches at Monson; 3.77 inches in Southwick

-New Hampshire: 3.55 inches in Temple

-New Jersey: 4.30 inches in Oakland

-New York: 3.93 inches near Cornwall-on-Hudson

-Pennsylvania: 2.73 inches in Palmer Township

-Rhode Island: 4.45 inches in Gloucester

-Vermont: 3.42 inches near Stamford

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.


The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.